You can make a difference as a fan, and you already do

Jim Rogash

Boston fans rock. So says the players that you are cheering on.

A whole lot of energy is being spent this year on watching the standings, rooting for losses, and arguing about why this is the "correct" way to cheer in a rebuilding year.  Whatever, I don't care how you root as long as it is respectful of letting other people root how they want.  At the end of the day, it means nothing because there's no cosmic tie between how you choose to root and which ping pong balls will show up on Lottery night.  It has no impact at all.

Fans can and do, however have an impact on the players themselves.  Just about any player will tell you that a supportive fan base is a great advantage in home games.  It just makes the whole experience of being part of a team that much more enjoyable.  If that is true, then the flipside must also be true.  Players tend to downplay any negative influence that the fans might have on them, but if you poll the players you'd probably find out that they are deflated somewhat by dispassionate or overly negative fans.

So you actually can make a difference with the team base on how vocal you are in support of the team.  That's more important than you might think.  So important, that it could very well influence free agents on where they choose to play.  In fact, there's one pretty important guy that will be a free agent in about a year who's already talking about how the fans might influence his decision.

Fan support appreciated, players realize they’re lucky | Boston Herald

"I know that would be a big reason why you wouldn’t want to leave a city like Boston," said Rondo, "because every night, even with the season we’re having, we’re probably still leading the league in attendance or at least up near the top. "I mean, the fans in Boston, they know the game. You can’t cheat the fans. They know the game. It’s fun to play there. It’s definitely something you appreciate even more once you go on the road and see other teams that have like 6,000 people in the stands. Every night, it’s 18,000 in Boston. "So you don’t take that for granted," Rondo said. "I know I don’t. I’ve been in the league for eight years, and in Boston the crowd is consistent. They’re always there."

Love to hear that from our Captain.  Love to hear that about our fans.

As usual, I'm not telling anyone how to root or what they should or shouldn't do at games.  Do what you like and how you feel led.  I'm just saying that there are some things that make a difference (regardless of the scale) and some that just don't.

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