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Steve Bulpett makes the case that these regular season matchups don't matter that much in the long run.

Anticipation for a game in February? Pinch yourself.

Just don’t believe that the sound of sneakers on the parquet will echo too far beyond the night. Yes, the Celtics can secure a tie in the season series, and there could be some homecourt-advantage ramifications if the C’s and Lakers finish with the same record. But understand, too, there is no statement that will be made in this one that cannot be forcibly retracted in 15 minutes of June.

Let’s say it is Celts-Lakers in the Finals again and that the series begins out west this time. Let’s say the Lakers win tonight and you have to read too many stories on how they have the C’s number. Let’s say the injured Andrew Bynum is back by then and the Celtics show up in California after a brutal series with Cleveland.

Now take it a step further and say the Lakers win Game 1 by 34 points. Make it 148-114 for the sake of the discussion. . . . All the Celtics would have to do is find a way to get Game 2, and the entire series would be turned around, which is precisely what happened in reverse in the 1985 Finals.

That's all well and good, and it makes perfect logical sense. However, I still really want this game.