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Rookies Use Scouting Reports To Study And Stay Sharp

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Apr 20, 2012; Atlanta, GA, USA; Atlanta Hawks power forward Vladimir Radmanovic (77) shoots over Boston Celtics forward JaJuan Johnson (12) during the first half at Philips Arena. Mandatory Credit: Paul Abell-US PRESSWIRE
Apr 20, 2012; Atlanta, GA, USA; Atlanta Hawks power forward Vladimir Radmanovic (77) shoots over Boston Celtics forward JaJuan Johnson (12) during the first half at Philips Arena. Mandatory Credit: Paul Abell-US PRESSWIRE

It is easy to forget about JaJuan Johnson and E'Twaun Moore when they are out of sight, out of mind. But they have to be prepared all the time. Like backup quarterbacks, they have to stay mentally sharp even if there's a better than good chance that they won't feel the hardwood touch the bottom of their sneakers.

This year is pretty unfortunate in that they don't even have the luxury a many practices in which to hone their craft. So where do they turn? To film and scouting reports.

Young Celtics make most of scouting reports

The scouting reports can serve as supplements to the game film players watch on the opposing team. As the rookies are learning about others in the league, these reports allow them to zone in on particular players who may not frequently appear on game tape, especially at this point in the season when more and more reserves who have seen limited playing time off the bench are on the court to spell minutes.

"I like a mixture of both because when you watch the game tape, it’s more generalization of what everybody can do on the team," Johnson explained. "It’s not just your position. When you at the scouting report, you can choose which person you want to look at and focus on."

Keep on studying guys. We'll need you to be ready next year and for years to come.